‘Creating A Legend: The Orange Shirt’

It’s understandable that a child would be upset by having to trade in a favourite piece of clothing for a school uniform, but it was the same for all children — not just aboriginal — at religious schools. What isn’t understandable is that she would still be holding a grievance all these years later. This is where counselling comes in… 

“‘Orange Shirt Day’ began in Williams Lake in 2013 and has since spread to schools across B.C. and Canada. ‘Orange Shirt Day’ (September 30th) is a day when we honour the ‘Indigenous’ {sic, ‘Aboriginal’} children who were sent away to residential schools in Canada and learn more about the history of those schools. 

“The “orange shirt” in ‘Orange Shirt Day’ refers to the new shirt that Phyllis Webstad was given to her by her grandmother for her first day of school at St. Joseph’s Mission residential school in British Columbia. When Phyllis got to school, they took away her clothes, including her new shirt. It was never returned. To Phyllis, the colour orange has always reminded her of her experiences at residential school…”

–‘What is Orange Shirt Day?’,
CBC Kids,
https://www.cbc.ca/kidscbc2/the-feed/what-is-orange-shirt-day

Feature IMAGE: From “THE ORANGE SHIRT STORY: TRUE STORY OF ORANGE SHIRT DAY”, Phyllis Webstad

Phyllis Webstad
Phyllis Webstad

I went to the Mission for one school year in 1973/1974. I had just turned 6 years old. I lived with my grandmother on the Dog Creek reserve. We never had very much money, but somehow my granny managed to buy me a new outfit to go to the Mission school…

When I got to the Mission, they stripped me, and took away my clothes, including the orange shirt! I never wore it again…The color orange has always reminded me of that and how my feelings didn’t matter, how no one cared and how I felt like I was worth nothing…

“Phyllis Webstad is Northern Secwpemc (Shuswap) from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem ‘First Nation’ (Canoe Creek Indian Band) {a ‘nation’ of 270 people}. She comes from mixed Secwepemc and Irish/French heritage {!}, was born in Dog Creek, and lives in Williams Lake, BC. Today, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son and three grandsons. She earned diplomas in Business Administration from the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology; and in Accounting from Thompson Rivers University…”
{Thanks to schooling provided by the Canadian taxpayers…}

–‘PHYLLIS’ STORY: the original orange shirt’,
http://www.orangeshirtday.org/phyllis-story.html

http://www.orangeshirtday.org/

Mohawk College
Mohawk College

“The initiative calls for every Canadian to wear an orange shirt on September 30 in the spirit of healing and reconciliation.

“The date, September 30, was chosen because that was the time of the year the trucks and buses would enter the communities to “collect” the children and deliver them to their harsh new reality of cultural assimilation, mental, sexual and physical abuse, shame and deprivation…”
{Wow, what a one-sided distortion of reality…}

https://www.ictinc.ca/blog/what-is-orange-shirt-day
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
See also:
Employers Have Rights, Too (Quality Foods/B.C.) {October 6, 2018}:
“Here’s a case of an entitled aboriginal deciding it was O.K. to skip his workplace uniform and instead wear a t-shirt promoting an Aboriginal Grievance Day. Of course, he’s now upset that the company sent him home — even though they gave him the bus fare…”
http://endracebasedlaw.ca/2018/10/06/employers-have-rights-too/
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Post also at: 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s